In the News

 

ranking_acm_logoTuning in to Graphene, Communications of the ACM, October, 2013
Burke’s team proved that graphene could function over a broad frequency range—at DC, 10GHz, 100GHz, and 100GHz–1.5THz in a single sweep…


 

logo-cenSpying On Subcellular Structures, C&EN News, May 31, 2013
Burke’s team used soft lithography to etch a silicon chip that served as a mold to make a nanofluidics device out of the polymer polydimethylsiloxane…


 

logo-cenTangled Nanotubes Make Speedy Transistors, IEEE Spectrum, July 1, 2011
Graduate student Nima Rouhi in Peter Burke’s group have been studying these unusual transistors, which contain channels made with carbon nanotube ink…


 

logo-cenDOD Awards $227 Million in Research Funding, C&EN News, July 16, 2011
The Department of Defense (DoD) announced plans today to make 32 awards to academic institutions to perform multidisciplinary basic research…


 

logo-cenMicromini Radio, Science Mag, November 9, 2007
A carbon nanotube 10,000 times as thin as a human hair turns radio waves into music, acting like a tiny radio, by researchers at the University of California, Irvine…


 

logo-cen‘World’s smallest radio’ unveiled, BBC News, October 18, 2007
According to a University of California team, the study marks the first time that a nano-sized detector has been demonstrated in a working radio system…


 

logo-cenRadio Nano Calling…Testing 1,2,3,4, New York Times Bits, October 17, 2007
Chris Rutherglen, the grad student at the University of California at Irvine, has constructed a key part–a demodulator out of a carbon nanotube 50 microns long and about 1.5 nanometers wide…


 

logo-cenNanotechnology: Tiny tunes, Nature, November 15, 2007
Chris Rutherglen and Peter Burke of the University of California, Irvine developed their own nanotube radio by exploiting the nonlinear current–voltage characteristics of a singlewalled carbon nanotube that was fixed to electrodes at both ends…


 

logo-cenUCI: Nanotubes faster than copper in chips, Silicon Valley Business Journal, June 9, 2005
Carbon nanotubes can route electrical signals on a computer chip faster than traditional copper or aluminum wires…


 

logo-cenScientists from UC Irvine Develop World’s Longest Electrically Conducting Nanotubes, NanoTech Wire, October 26, 2004
These 0.4 cm nanotubes are 10 times longer than previously created electrically conducting nanotubes…


 

logo-cenUC Irvine Scientists Develop World’s Longest Electrically Conducting Nanotube, RF GlobalNet, October 20, 2004
UC Irvine announced that scientists at The Henry Samueli School of Engineering have synthesized the world’s longest electrically conducting nanotubes…


 

logo-cenScientists Develop World’s Longest Electrically Conducting Nanotubes, Space Daily, October 20, 2004
UC Irvine announced that scientists at The Henry Samueli School of Engineering have synthesized the world’s longest electrically conducting nanotubes…


 

logo-cenUC Irvine scientists develop world’s longest electrically conducting nanotubes , UC Irvine Today, October 18, 2004
Breakthrough discovery is 10 times longer than previous current-carrying nanotubes, paves way for supercomputer and health care applications…


 

logo-cenUC Irvine scientists develop world’s longest electrically conducting nanotubes, Eurika Alert, October 18, 2004
Breakthrough discovery is 10 times longer than previous current-carrying nanotubes, paves way for supercomputer and health care applications…


 

logo-cenScientists Develop World’s Longest Electrically Conducting Nanotubes, Science Daily, October 19, 2004
UC Irvine announced that scientists at The Henry Samueli School of Engineering have synthesized the world’s longest electrically conducting nanotubes…


 

logo-cenScientists Develop World’s Longest Electrically Conducting Nanotubes, Nano Tsunami, October 1, 2004
UC Irvine announced that scientists at The Henry Samueli School of Engineering have synthesized the world’s longest electrically conducting nanotubes…


 

logo-cenNanotube Transistors Speed Up, NanoTech Web, April 30, 2004
Peter Burke and colleagues at UC Irvine showed that their device – which consists of a single-walled carbon nanotube sandwiched between two gold electrodes – operates at extremely fast microwave frequencies…


 

logo-cenHigh-speed nanotube transistors could lead to better cell phones, faster computers, The Register, April 27, 2004
Peter Burke and his colleagues built an electrical circuit with a carbon nanotube between two gold electrodes…


 

logo-cenEngineering professor receives Navy ‘Young Investigator’ Grant, UCI Today, May 1, 2002
Peter J. Burke, assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was awarded a highly selective Young Investigator grant by the Office of Naval Research…